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a brief description of Brutalist architecture



RWC tutor Jimmy Calvert gives an overview of brutalist architecture.


Brutalism in architecture has always been regarded as inhuman and cold. But there is so much more to it. It contains a rich history of humanity's desire to abandon tradition– something every new generation is guilty of.


How Did it Start

Brutalist architecture started in the 1950s in the United Kingdom as part of the reconstruction projects from World War II. Its architectural style is seen in its display of building materials rather than in more decorative styles that hide or mask the structural elements of the building. Despite many people’s idea that brutalism originated from the idea of defying tradition, which existed heavily in the design of low-income social housing; in other words, it was practicality more than social commentary. Of course, to some extent, the emphasized use of concrete was heavily in the design of low-income social housing– in other words, practicality more than social commentary. Of course, to some extent, the emphasized use of concrete was social commentary as concrete symbolized equality in many socialist nations instead of decorated traditional styles associated with the bourgeoisie or those who owned society’s wealth. Regardless of the polarization surrounding this style of architecture, it has recently gained popularity, gaining support from local communities near the buildings themselves and, of course, modern architects.


Famous Examples-

Some famous examples of brutalist architecture can be seen in many buildings that are still used to this day, such as Habitat 67 (image to the bottom left) in Montreal, Quebec, The Bank of Georgia (image to the top left) in Tbilisi, Georgia, and Hotel Panorama image to the top right) in Štrbské Pleso, Slovakia– which famously appears on the cover of Belarusian post-punk band Molchat Doma’s album Etazhi.

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